Family room trim, day 2

Today was much more fulfilling than yesterday.  If you compare the pictures, you’ll see why!

It always takes me awhile to get back in the groove of hauling up all the tools and starting the circus of sawing, shaving, cutting, sanding, shimming and nailing that’s necessary to install door and window trim.  At least a couple of times during the last two days I wished that we had torn down the plaster instead of drywalling over the top.  Which is worse?  Tearing down some plaster, which takes just a little physical labor, or creating a trim nightmare by increasing your wall depth?  What made it so bad is that the drywall is not at a uniform depth, so the depth difference varies from 1/2″ to 3/4″, sometimes along the length of a given piece of casing.  That meant I had to try to cut and sand down a  strip of fir at an angle to try to even things out.  Of the four openings in this room, only the closet door cooperated by needing a constant 1/2″ filler strip.

Next?  Finishing the base trim and filling all the old and new nail holes, a little more sanding and then onto staining.  I also need to buy, finish and install the crown and the little cap trim that sits on top of the base.  I never have any idea what that piece is called.  I will be going to McCoy Millwork to get these pieces, since I couldn’t find anything appropriate at the usual suspects, Mr. Plywood and Home Depot.

I went through the site and realized that we didn’t have any “before” pictures of this room.  I created a new post so you can see what it used to look like.  Don’t be fooled by the walls in the picture.  The white paint over the wallpaper over the cracked plaster photographed really well!

Door now has trim
Door now has trim
Side window and first piece of base trim
Side window and first piece of base trim
Closet door and window facing patio
Closet door and window facing patio
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6 thoughts on “Family room trim, day 2

  1. Wow! That all looks amazing. I can appreciate the work that you have put in, as I’ve lost my mind simply doing the baseboards, which in our house is basic MDF square edge trim. Very impressive work, really!!

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  2. Julio, this may come too late, but the way the old carpenters dealt with your jamb situation (which was very common with plaster!) was to use 2-piece jambs, with one piece rabbeted on the front and the other rabbeted on the back where they met – they could slide them together or apart to compensate for uneven wall thicknesses or even walls that weren’t parallel front & back. The joint would fall under the stop moulding so it wouldn’t show. You could rip your jambs without the rabbets, although it would require more exposed nailing… all in all, an awesome job you’re doing!

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  3. Thanks, Heather!

    Bob, thanks for your tip. It always amazes me what the “old timers” came up with. Now that we have power tools for every single thing, we (meaning me) have to struggle to come up with solutions that for problems that were solved (by hand) 100 years ago. I managed to fudge my way through ours, and now that everything is all stained, the extra pieces of wood really blend in well. The rabbeted jambs sound cool, but to be honest, I’ve never rabbeted anything in my life.

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  4. Oddly enough, the cap that you put on top of the base is called “Base Cap”. If you don’t find what you need at McCoy be sure to checkout Rejuvenation. I get all of my molding from those two places.

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  5. Thanks, Joe. We ended up getting this from McCoy, but it was the exact same profile I found at Mr. Plywood. The original one in the house is slightly different, but it’s not something that would be noticed without a microscope 😉

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  6. Come finish my house kthx!

    Good to know about the plaster. I keep debating whether we should make the disgusting mess of tearing down the old plaster or not. It sounds like it may be worth it as long as we can keep the dust mostly contained to the room and not our entire house again. Yuck! Both bedrooms are the exact project you are doing and about the same size. 10×11 and 12×10. Gotta sock up some $$ to pay for it all, though.

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